Mutual Assistance in the European Union: A Model for the World?

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Sunday, September 1, 2002
Author: 
Ilias Anagnostopoulos
Volume: 
18
Issue: 
9
367
Abstract: 

The Council of the European Union (Brussels) established on May 29, 2000 in accordance with Article 34 of the Treaty on European Union the Convention on Mutual Assistance in Criminal Matters between Member States of the European Union (?the EU Convention?). The Council of the European Union is becoming the most important source of new legal instruments, producing conventions to be adopted without or with only few reservations by member states, as well as framework decisions to be implemented under tight time schedules such as the one on the European warrant of arrest. The Council of the European Union is becoming the most important source of new legal instruments, producing conventions to be adopted without or with only few reservations by member states, as well as framework decisions to be implemented under tight time schedules such as the one on the European warrant of arrest. The new legal instruments on mutual assistance in criminal matters will change its face in Europe. They are also expected to have a significant impact all over the world and possibly mark the beginning of a new era in this fast developing area. Of particular importance are the provisions regarding new investigative powers, which may be exercised within the territory of the requested state. The establishment of so called joint investigation teams for specific purposes, the joint conduct of controlled deliveries and covert investigations by undercover agents integrate judicial investigative acts and proactive police techniques.